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latino president of the united states has been born. now, he could be, or she could be, an infant right now, or in second grade, or in high school, or maybe even in the united states senate. but it's clear from looking at the united states and the changes in our demography that latinos will continue to play a larger role in national dialogue. if you look at the specifics, in 2004, 7.6 million latinos are said to have voted in the united states. that's according to research that's been done at the national level. in 2008 in a presidential election, that jumped up to 9.7 million. now there are estimates that in this coming election in november, that the number could go all the way up to as high as 12 million. and that number is only going to grow, so i think it makes it all the more relevant to examine the life of somebody like marco rubio. in some respects i kind of think of him a little bit as almost a test case for how the american population relates to a latino politician. that was reason enough for me to write a book about him. because in the same way that you look at the reasons why
's -- frappucinos. most are made in the united states. i realized why i am paying $4 for my frappucino. why is it that you are allowed to -- your able to make lenders in the united states and sell them to these specialty coffee shops. jody explained that the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blunders. one, they don't want any moraes. why? let's say you go to barnes and noble, and i do go to the chain stores still, if you go to starbucks and the blender is making noise you are not going dillinger and going to the store. so, they want to make sure that there is absolutely no noise in the blender. second, for those of you that enjoy frappucinos you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that they actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what jody was able to do is to actually work with these specialty coffee shops on the design of the blender that they want to come and that is a very difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something
to a brilliant woman about why is it you are allowed -- able to make splendors in the united states and sell them to specialty coffee shops. jody explained the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blenders. they don't want any noise. you go to a bunch and noble or chain stores and they have the starbucks fare and they're making noise and won't wonder and go into the stores. they want to make sure there is no noise in the blenders. secondly for those who enjoyed cappuccino you know you don't want ice chips so make sure the blenders actually crushed the ice chips properly. so what jody was able to do was actually work with the specialty coffee shops on the design of the blunders they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something and interacting with them would be very complicated. the customization of products that allow a small and medium-sized manufacturers know is inherently possible to do in the united states and it wasn't just jody engage in this
democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was republican. bill clinton did have a full congress that was republican but bill clinton was democrat. and
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
frappucinos early in the united states. my first learned that i sit now i know why pay $4 for my frappucinos. i said why is it that you are allowed to -- you are able to make blunders in the united states come and sell them to the specialty coffee shops, and she explained that the specialty coffee shops have specified requirements. one, they won't want illinois is they have starbucks and of the blenders are making noise you aren't going to go into the store. so they want to make sure that there is no malaise. second for those of you you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that it's actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what he was able to do is actually work with a specialty coffee shop on the design of the blunder they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. if you are in china and brazil figuring out how to design something interesting with them would be very complicated. as of the customization of the products that a lot of the small and medium-size manufacturers build is actually inherently impossible to do in the united states and w
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
for the members of united states supreme court. they should have single terms. that's a small deal when we're talking that fundamental change. so let me suggest proposals that i would like to see argued about on c-span. and incidentally, let me also say because another question someone might have in mind come where did it come from. i have an answer to that. and it's based on a wonderful book written by paul woodruff called first democracy, which, in fact, returns to ancient athens and suggests that we select more leaders than we do our lottery. whether or not the house and senate should be selected by lottery we can debate, but it seems to me that it would be wonderful, select members of the convention by lottery. basically nationwide jury. then the three proposal i would like to hear them discuss, not necessary in order of importance, first of all, how do we adjust institutions developed in 1787 under the assumption of rule by the neville and political elites -- who would more or less share a notion of the public interest. how do we make those institutions congruent with the kind of part
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
, to create air force base in many places around the united states were drone pilots everything being trained for drones are being tested or piloted. so this is a new kind of warfare, where you don't even have to be in the area of the battle. you can be thousands and thousands of miles away thinking that the battlefield to a video screen. in fact, the manufacturers admit that the screens are really -- design is taken taken from the video games that teenagers have grown up playing and it's easier for them when they are recruited and become drone pilot. they are used to using these kinds of playstation. enjoy. in fact, the u.n. has u.s. has created a playstation mentality through war. it is a very surreal thing to think about pilot been in an air force base in the united states over the drones are being run by the cia they are, they can be outside of virginia and they are in an air-conditioned room. they are sitting in an ergonomic chair and they are looking for hours and hours on end at a scene in a place that they may never have been to. don't sleep the language, don't know the closer. and th
for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] >> find in the speech from both the democratic and republican conventions on line at the c-span video library. book tv coverage from the 2012 rose above reading festival continues. mary stuck the talks about her book, the finding americans, the presidency in national identity. >> now i have to try to be engaging. i think the most important thing to understand about the presidency in this context is that we always have choices. when you pick a president you are absolutely picking a particular kind of policy, but you're also picking a definition of our national identity -- identity. if you hear president and you like what they're saying to make you feel yourself call to the presidency than they are speaking to you about a sense of the national self that is deeply imbedded in all of us, and every time there's a presidential alexian will one of our previous presidents learned to his sorrow has the vision thing is really an important part of what the presidency does because we see ourselves as a nation through the ways that presidents
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
here is a young man who is the half brother of the president of the united states, barack obama is not only of multimillionaire but the most powerful man in the world. and yet his half-brother can't call him in a time of need and this same half brothers living in a 6 x 10 at slum dog millionaire style in nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. this is a a guy not just living in poverty but in third-world poverty. what is going on here? the simple explanation is barack obama is a hypocrite. he has made the ideas that we have obligations to our fellow man the centerpiece of his reelection campaign, one of his favorite lines he recently added at the national prayer breakfast is we are our brother's keeper. in my film "2016: obama's america," the film is coming to michigan. look at our website 2016themovie.com. in the film i asked george, obama says we are our brother's keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? quite revealing the george says go ask him. hypocrisy would seem to be the natural explanation. george is not an isolated case.
is the half-brother of the president of the united states. barack obama is not only a multimillionaire, produced the most powerful man in the world. and yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need and the same half brother is living in a six by 10 hut slum dog millionaire style in their room a slump of nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. so this is a guy that they not just in poverty, but you have to say in third world poverty. so what is going on here? the simple explanation is that barack obama is a hypocrite. he has made the idea that we have obligations to our fellow man the centerpiece of his reelection campaign. one of his favorite lines, which he recently uttered at the national prayer breakfast as we are our brothers keepers. and my film, 2016. by the way, the film is coming to michigan. you should look at our website 2016 the movie.com. [applause] but in the film, i asked george that. i say george, obama says we are our brothers keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? harborview and make george says go ask him. so h
to me. now, i thought to myself, here 1 ssh -- is a young man, half brother of the united states. barack is not only a multimillionaire, but the most powerful man in the world. yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need, and this same half brother is living in a six by ten hut slum dog millionaire style in the slum of the nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. this is a guy not just living in poverty, but in third world poverty. what's going op here? the simple explanation is that barack is a hypocrite. he has made the idea we have obligations to our fellow man, the center piece of his reaction campaign. one of his favorite lines that he recently uttered at the national prayer breakfast is, "we are our brother's keeper." in my film, 2016, by the way, the film is coming to michigan. just look at the website, 2016itmovie.com. [applause] in the film, i asked george that. i said, george, obama said you are our brother's keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? revealingly, george says, go ask him. hypocrisy seems to be the natural ex
. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think actually. but those are i hope interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly i don't think that they are very important. here is an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer. but this is basically all you need to know. if there is a takeaway i've gotten to the point earlier there are five republicans and four democrats and that tells you much of what you need to know. it is true the justices where the roads because they are supposed to look alike and it's supposed to give the perception that they are all pretty much the same. but just as the united states congress is a deeply divided according to the party, so is the united states supreme court, and this is a moment of partisan division at the supreme court, and of that is exemplified in case after case. why this is of important you need to go back in history in the supreme court to a different period in the court to the mid 60's and the lat
been -- had, done, which is to explain her strong connection to the united states. has not only has she been to this country five times -- 11 times, excuse me, five of them on private holidays, the most vacation time she has ever spent anywhere outside her privateutsi estate, some of her closestv friends are americans which may be one of the biggest surprises. she is also known -- she has also known every president from harry truman to barack obama with the exception of lyndonm johnson who tried but fail today meet her. i remember being impressed whenr an official at the american embassy in london told me that during the memorial service att st. paul's cathedral after the 9/11 attacks, the queen sang every single word of the american national anthem. and i would betsi that therem. aren't any presidents who canh sing all the words to "god save the queen." since we are here today on the national mall, i thought i woul focus on the queen's fondness ml for this country and its people, pote little known and well known, and in so doingnown illuminate corners of her life that can help you unde
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
to protect the interest in libya. it was a clear it was deal between the united states and france. i think in syria we have to care about the people being killed and not the strategic interest which is i think is the case today. >> i'm a journalist from egypt visiting d.c., and returning back again to cover the i i did i did diad.a. lem that. you said that the islamist in egypt say that the -- [inaudible] this is not the case. [inaudible] to islam and what can be solution to this gap which i think will not be solvent in the upcoming years. we will have -- problems. >> thank you. thank you for this question. first, what are you saying about the muslim hood and what was said was right. that's right. let me finish. he was talking about changing and reforming the individual, the family, and the society and at the end to get the islamic state and this was against the british residence and liberate the country toward the islam state. this is clear. if you look what is happening now within the muslim brotherhood you cannot say it is the same discourse. you can't say this. you might they they are
. because one thing that is unique of the united states, you go round, the free market system is really supported by a vast majority of the american people. this is not true in europe. it's not true in asia. it's not true and latin america. and my understanding of this, it is because they have experienced a superior form of capitalism. what drives this for a free market systems? because there's a tension between free markets and democracy. democracy was somehow intent for mortgage vision and free markets, equal outcome because it's necessary to provide proper incentives. so why people should support, and the answer is because number one, the system is so productive, so efficient that they make everybody better off, the engine of growth, brian was talking about. number two is because all this growth gets sort of than a decent enough share so that even the poor are reached, and the third one is because they think that this system is fair. and, of course, it's a bit of a vicious circle that what you think is fair depends on your view, edit your be the sort of the market competition is fair
lived, or james madison, or abraham lincoln, would united states exist? if it did exist would be the same country we know to be? what other people have, thought, fill the shoes and done what they did, or would things be markedly different? for our purposes tonight, the question is if william f. buckley, jr. had not lived, what conservatism be what it is today or would it be different? would have been a conservative movement? had there been a conservative movement, which it had achieved the same success that it has achieved? i'm going to put that question aside for a moment and try to circle back to it later. let's start with who was buckley. well, he had six different careers, or he did things that would have been, would have filled careers for six people and made them whole and quite a few successful. let's start with the fact he was a syndicated columnist. he wrote for many, many, many years. in fact, up until he died, a column called on the right. at its height it was published three times a week in 350 newspapers. he was one of the most widely read columnists in the countr
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
for president of the united states in 2016 and to be the first fifth third party candidate in history to win the presidency. >> this is booktv on c-span2. we are at freedom fest held annually in lost biggest talking with several different authors and we've been talking with win ellen ruda who lives in las vegas. the conscience of the libertarian as the name of the books. >> book tv in is on location at the annual freedom fest conference and we are interviewing several different authors and are pleased to be joined now by the vice presidential nominee for the libertarian party for vice president of the united states, judge james gray who's also in author and his book is called with the drug will has failed and what we can do about it. if we could come start with your background. it's been a i was in ucla then i was in the peace corps for two years and by the way you see and the vice presidential nominee for the libertarian party, will be the first peace corps volunteer to be elected in the national office and that this kind of pleasing. after that i went to usc and was drafted as a way joined
major office. i give up the opportunity in my plan is for president of the united states for 2016 and my plan is to be the first third-party candidate to win the presidency. >> guest: >> host: this is booktv on c-span two. where freedom fest held annually in las vegas, talking to several authors. we've been talking with wayne allyn root. "the conscience of a libertarian" as the name of the book. >> and booktv is on location in las vegas at the annual freedom fest conference and we are interviewing several authors here and were pleased to be joined now by the vice presidential nominee for the libertarian party for vice president for vice president of the united states, judge james gray, who is also an author and his book is called "why our drug laws have failed and what we can do about it." judge gray, if we could does start with your background. tell us your background. >> guest: sure, i was at ucla, go bruins, not sort of thing. and i was in the peace corps two years in costa rica. and on the vice presidential nominee for the party. i'm the first peace corps volunteer to be elected to n
, justice alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals. on monday, the constitution and the united states turned 225. the next program is one of the several the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document signed in philadelphia in september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests of the past, present and future united states constitution. partners for tonight's program in honor of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center. thanks for the opportunity to collaborate this evening. well, the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence of nationhood. the constitution did not get as much attention. it is not a saran is the decorations and as for parchment pages to the decorations single sheet to turn most casual readers. the lack of celebration, however, work to its advantage. over the years the declaration by success or semi, dust and smoke, but the constitution never exhibited. when you feel both original documents upstairs in the rotunda can you
reach its foreign policy goals while under the wing of the united states which he says count always have israel's -- doesn't always have israel's best interests at heart. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> shalom, good evening, everybody. it is my pleasure to be here with you, especially when you have such great weather in washington. almost like jerusalem at this time of the year. i am very happy to see so many people coming and showing an interest in my book, and i would like in the next 20 minutes to share with you not what you're going to read in the book, but what's behind the ideas. but first i want to think we all can agree that's what's happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. and because we are in the middle east today being attacked, so you have to ask yourself why those people are against the jewish nation in the middle east. the arab against israel not because of the land that we so-called occupied. we are being attacked be
loans was because his motive was to get more green energy in the united states, right? so what was the motive behind operation and furious? the people i talk to said, look, they knew that gun control was a politically-suicidal issue to take up especially before the 2010 election based on the 1994 election, rahm emanuel at the time was president obama's chief of staff, he is a smart guy. and so you look at the evidence of the e-mails, the internal e-mails, the sources i've talked to, and they say this wasn't an issue of legislating gun dealers out of business, this is an effort to regulate them out of business, and the obama administration has a habit of when they can't get something through congress, they go through regulatory agencies. this falls into that pattern. at the beginning of the obama administration, president obama right out o the gate made gun trafficking and taking on these mexican cartels a top priority. he was in mexico within three months of his inauguration. hillary clinton was there, eric holder was there, and they were all pushing that 90% of guns found in m
to have to buy the book to get that. now, i start with this proposition. the united states, for a variety of reasons, no longer has the means to fulfill the three great dreams that have driven american politics over the last decade. one, the dream of business and wall street for deregulation and infinite profits. two, the dream of our military and foreign policy elite for global domination. three, the dream of the ordinary american for a rising living standard. now, one out of three? certainly. two out of three? maybe. three out of three? no way. now, you know, you turn on the tv at night, and you read the newspapers in the morning, and the pundits and politicians are talking about a grand bargain that must be made between liberals and conservatives, republicans and democrats, about taxes, about the budget, and it's all couched in the future of america. well, my first point here is that the bargain's already made. the deal has already been struck. that is of the three great dreams, the one that's going to go, the one that's going to go is the living standards of the american working middl
howard taft was both supreme court chief justice and before that a president of the united states, came from cincinnati. cincinnati in some ways was a southern town because it was oriented, its trade was with the south along the ohio river and the mississippi. it also was the home of the underground railroad. so if you could get slaves -- the slaves could get out of kentucky and cross the ohio river, in some ways they were safe in ohio. and then they could be dispersed to other places where they were even safer in ohio. so taft was from here. harding was from marion, ohio, just north of columbus here. william mckinley who was elected president in 1896 was an ohioan. so a whole bunch of ohioans. james garfield, again, was an ohioan. he was a short-lived president because he was assassinated in office. but you have a set of presidents who came during this period, many many after the civil war all the way up into the 1920s. and then it sort of stops. they were pulling presidents from other parts of the country afterwards. they tend to be more moderate, for one thing. they don't tend to be
give me pleasure to say[a that i was introducing the next president of the united states. [cheers] [applause]ep and it would give you a lot of pleasure as well, i'm sure. millions whon woke up in is wh disappointment on november 3, they might be looking to what our guest will be doing in theeu immediate future.on the jou based on the journey and the stance he has taken, many americans should rejoice overict that the voice they will have ir their government. the a voice that speaks for expanding opportunities and civil liberties. a voice that speaks to the promise that will help us come out of the long local darkness. obamse join me in welcoming the man behind not always, barack obama. [cheers]thank yo [applause] [cheers] [applause] >> thank you, thank you. thank you. thank you very much.. [cheers]ppreciate it [applause] thank you, i appreciate it. thank you very much. thank you so much. but i know that i made a speech tha] there are no red states and blue states, but i suspect that thisc state is kind of blue looking at the crowd out here tonight. what a magnificent turnout. i am
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
back to boston and that's when he found the great anti-slavery publication in the united states. then he wrote an article about a story that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walking across the bridge over the potomac and a constable started chasing her. the constable supplemented income by selling bikes into slavery for the woman ran away because she knew they were trying to kidnapper. she fell into the water and they got her body out and they buried her. so one man man wrote an article i cited and said here's the name of the constable. and the district attorney, if he won't do anything about it, congress should do something about it. he hit the roof and was furious. he immediately charged him with libel. he charged him and his printer, another white man who helped him on the article -- when they did the same thing to garrison. he was facing a thousand dollar fine. which would be like $20,000 or, $100,000 in today's money. and so he collected one last meal from his friends and he took all and went to philadelphia. so yes, the anti-slavery movement was
at what was going on in the united states. and you can even see this in henry kissinger's memoirs and on historical record and an archives in our archives over here how the negotiator for the north vietnamese would bring this up to kissinger. he would bring up what was going on in congress, was going on in the streets to try to rattle kissinger who would always answer this is beneath me, i'm not going to talk about what's going on in the united states. at any end i i believe that north vietnamese leaders never really relied on negotiations to win the war. they knew that they had to win on their own and it had to be militarily on the ground. thank you. >> several years ago i had the opportunity to travel around the it now for six weeks, about half the time in the north, which is to be the north, about half the time in the south. and in talking with people, my impression was people in the north, very proud of having defeated the united states, the great power. people in the south, very sad that the united states hadn't in some way managed to stay, to keep with economists. is that co
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
in the united states of america, and we know the problem with the democracies now is not the dogmatic decisions of religions, but some decisions of frans national cooperation and economy power deciding without being able to say anything and we cull it democracy, still today dealing with power that are beyond the procedure. the banks, transnational cooperation, and, for example, in greece, in spain, in italy, we have those coming to solve the problem we never elected them, but money is choosing them. we have to deal with not simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from states, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on to the state which is also imposing decision on to us as citizens. this western model, i think, be washington. we all have to deal with problems and crisis from within. i wouldn't push the arab world to follow blindly the western model, but take the better, the best from the others and try their own way. having said that, the first problem is the nature of the state. why -- i was referring to this dpsh voided referring to islamic states, and if you
obama who emerges as a whole global treen amex systems until he becomes president of the united states. >> host: >> guest: in butler county is where obama's mother grew up and natalie and the rest of the store in topeka which is the state capital because he lived there for a short time. his father, the president's great grandfather was an auto repair man and a great-grandmother was married at age 15 and a very difficult marriage but in the book begins with suicide in topeka and then stanley, the president's grandfather comes back to butler county and that's where he reads the grandmother and the story begins but it wouldn't have happened without but suicide. >> host: we want to show a montage shot by your wife on your trip to kansas in april, 2009. >> in all conversations [inaudible conversations] >> a >> it's where his great grandmother committed suicide, and stan dunham, obama's grandfather, was 8 years old aty the time, and his mother, obama's great grandmother, died. they lived in the little house here down on buchanan street down a few blocks, and the great grandfather, ralph dunh
the constitution of the united states? would you, please, recite the constitution? [laughter] have you ever read the constitution if. >> no. >> what's your favorite part? >> i like the bit around the edge. [laughter] i like that. the sort of, like the old pirate map kind of coffee-stained looking bit. >> who wrote the constitution? >> george madison. >> that's not a person. >> washington? >> that is a person, but that's incorrect. >> george jefferson? [laughter] correct, final answer. do i win? >> have you realize the constitution? >> no, but i did see the movie. [laughter] great. >> there is no movie. >> spoiler alert. sorry. >> that's why i rewrote the constitution. [laughter] good night, everybody, thank you very much. [applause] that explains it all. that is just the tip of the iceberg. in my research for this book or, as i like to call it inevitably, my mesearch, forgive me -- [laughter] yes, more american teenagers can name the three stooges than the three branches of government, pretty shocking. almost three-quarters of americans believe of the people, by the people, for the people is in
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
african-american writers on the election of barack obama, 44th president of the united states. [applause] next we have professor cornell west. [applause] with cornell as we all know is another national and international icon and in national treasure in his own right. he is a professor of civil rights activists philosopher, human rights activist who and really one of the boldest public intellectuals that we have in the united states today. he speaks truth to power even when when he speaks is unpopular he has the structure to be critical and against the grain even when it's hurt him and is standing in the black community. so cornell's latest book is the rich and the rest of us and we are proud and happy to have him here today. [applause] next we have fred harris, who is professor of political science at columbia university where he directs the institute for research and african-american studies. [applause] professor harris's latest book is the price of the ticket, barack obama and the rise and decline of black politics and professor harris is one of the leading scholars of african-american
was an american citizen and born in the united states. therefore under the 14th amendment, a citizen by birth. he went hollywood high school. he was in the class of 1921 at hollywood high school. he went off to the frank wiggins trade school to study to be an auto mechanic. he graduated in 1923. he opened up a barrage in hollywood. he liked model racecars and he loved photography. he was an amateur photographer. he also developed an alias for himself. that he used at times. his name was bill manbo. he developed a french version of his name that he would use. he would refer to himself as pierre manbeaux. he actually changed the spelling to be more french. in his spare key has built a little foyer with plywood in front of the door and arcing artistically across this little entry way is the name, pierre manbeaux. he was a clerk there. he was such a character. next to him is his wife. bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both from japan. he had trained as a mechanical draftsman, but the number of different jobs when he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in norw
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